Simply Complex : Complex Simplicity

asylum-art:

Fire in the sky? Incredible pictures of flame-coloured twister were actually taken in a river running through a mine 
It looks like a giant tornado is causing mayhem in the sky - but this image is simply the reflection of a river running through a mine. To create this spectacular moment, photographer Tomas Bogonez went to the Rio Tinto’s mining zone along the Rio Tinto river in Huelva, Spain. A site along the river has been used for mining for centuries and that is why the colours in the photographs are so bright and vivid.



asylum-art:

Fire in the sky? Incredible pictures of flame-coloured twister were actually taken in a river running through a mine 
It looks like a giant tornado is causing mayhem in the sky - but this image is simply the reflection of a river running through a mine. To create this spectacular moment, photographer Tomas Bogonez went to the Rio Tinto’s mining zone along the Rio Tinto river in Huelva, Spain. A site along the river has been used for mining for centuries and that is why the colours in the photographs are so bright and vivid.



asylum-art:

Fire in the sky? Incredible pictures of flame-coloured twister were actually taken in a river running through a mine 
It looks like a giant tornado is causing mayhem in the sky - but this image is simply the reflection of a river running through a mine. To create this spectacular moment, photographer Tomas Bogonez went to the Rio Tinto’s mining zone along the Rio Tinto river in Huelva, Spain. A site along the river has been used for mining for centuries and that is why the colours in the photographs are so bright and vivid.



asylum-art:

Fire in the sky? Incredible pictures of flame-coloured twister were actually taken in a river running through a mine 
It looks like a giant tornado is causing mayhem in the sky - but this image is simply the reflection of a river running through a mine. To create this spectacular moment, photographer Tomas Bogonez went to the Rio Tinto’s mining zone along the Rio Tinto river in Huelva, Spain. A site along the river has been used for mining for centuries and that is why the colours in the photographs are so bright and vivid.



asylum-art:

Fire in the sky? Incredible pictures of flame-coloured twister were actually taken in a river running through a mine 
It looks like a giant tornado is causing mayhem in the sky - but this image is simply the reflection of a river running through a mine. To create this spectacular moment, photographer Tomas Bogonez went to the Rio Tinto’s mining zone along the Rio Tinto river in Huelva, Spain. A site along the river has been used for mining for centuries and that is why the colours in the photographs are so bright and vivid.



asylum-art:

Fire in the sky? Incredible pictures of flame-coloured twister were actually taken in a river running through a mine 
It looks like a giant tornado is causing mayhem in the sky - but this image is simply the reflection of a river running through a mine. To create this spectacular moment, photographer Tomas Bogonez went to the Rio Tinto’s mining zone along the Rio Tinto river in Huelva, Spain. A site along the river has been used for mining for centuries and that is why the colours in the photographs are so bright and vivid.



asylum-art:

Fire in the sky? Incredible pictures of flame-coloured twister were actually taken in a river running through a mine 
It looks like a giant tornado is causing mayhem in the sky - but this image is simply the reflection of a river running through a mine. To create this spectacular moment, photographer Tomas Bogonez went to the Rio Tinto’s mining zone along the Rio Tinto river in Huelva, Spain. A site along the river has been used for mining for centuries and that is why the colours in the photographs are so bright and vivid.

asylum-art:

Fire in the sky? Incredible pictures of flame-coloured twister were actually taken in a river running through a mine 

It looks like a giant tornado is causing mayhem in the sky - but this image is simply the reflection of a river running through a mine. To create this spectacular moment, photographer Tomas Bogonez went to the Rio Tinto’s mining zone along the Rio Tinto river in Huelva, Spain. A site along the river has been used for mining for centuries and that is why the colours in the photographs are so bright and vivid.





heroineheroine:

2jam4u:

dynamicafrica:

Spotlight: Photographer Damion Reid and the “Beauty of the Black Woman” Project.
How do you describe what a black woman is? How do you even begin to define her?
You don’t. You leave that up to her.
As black women, as black people, we are well aware of our complexities - whether inherited or otherwise. What’s more, despite our differences being used to divide and separate us, whether through experience or heritage, history has played out in such a way that we are and will always be connected to each other in ways words cannot even begin to describe. As romantic as this may sound, and though there is so much beauty in who we are, there’s a lot of pain that we are still forced to triumph through. Despite all this, as we combat that which has manifested in our lives through both structural and internal racism, it’s so important that we look for ways to find and recreate ourselves on our terms.
Living in a world where black women have to constantly defend their existence and personally find ways to continuously reaffirm their beauty and self-worth, it’s hard not to love what Damion Reid does.
As a Communications Major, Reid was, to say the least, troubled by the negative images and stories he’d often come across of Black women and Black people in the Diaspora. In the Spring of 2002, armed with his camera and desire to show the multi-faceted reality of Black women, he began approaching women he’d see in public in an attempt to capture the “Beauty of the Black Woman.”
Ridding himself of mainstream notions of what beauty is or is supposed to look like, Reid opted to go for something deeper when approaching women, "I share a spiritual bond with Black Women. They are the only people that can understand what me a Black Male goes through. That is beauty to me. I go with my feelings. If it feels right to approach someone, I will do it."
So far, the responses Reid has received have been incredibly positive and wonderfully surprising, “Sometimes the Women are shocked that I want to photograph them. They were not used to be called beautiful, much less photographed.”
For Reid, this is a “never-ending project.” He does plan on taking things further and is currently working on a project that concerns Black men in the Diaspora. 
All photos courtesy of Damion Reid.
Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Instagram | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

oh lol I’m included!


I want to be all of them 💕heroineheroine:

2jam4u:

dynamicafrica:

Spotlight: Photographer Damion Reid and the “Beauty of the Black Woman” Project.
How do you describe what a black woman is? How do you even begin to define her?
You don’t. You leave that up to her.
As black women, as black people, we are well aware of our complexities - whether inherited or otherwise. What’s more, despite our differences being used to divide and separate us, whether through experience or heritage, history has played out in such a way that we are and will always be connected to each other in ways words cannot even begin to describe. As romantic as this may sound, and though there is so much beauty in who we are, there’s a lot of pain that we are still forced to triumph through. Despite all this, as we combat that which has manifested in our lives through both structural and internal racism, it’s so important that we look for ways to find and recreate ourselves on our terms.
Living in a world where black women have to constantly defend their existence and personally find ways to continuously reaffirm their beauty and self-worth, it’s hard not to love what Damion Reid does.
As a Communications Major, Reid was, to say the least, troubled by the negative images and stories he’d often come across of Black women and Black people in the Diaspora. In the Spring of 2002, armed with his camera and desire to show the multi-faceted reality of Black women, he began approaching women he’d see in public in an attempt to capture the “Beauty of the Black Woman.”
Ridding himself of mainstream notions of what beauty is or is supposed to look like, Reid opted to go for something deeper when approaching women, "I share a spiritual bond with Black Women. They are the only people that can understand what me a Black Male goes through. That is beauty to me. I go with my feelings. If it feels right to approach someone, I will do it."
So far, the responses Reid has received have been incredibly positive and wonderfully surprising, “Sometimes the Women are shocked that I want to photograph them. They were not used to be called beautiful, much less photographed.”
For Reid, this is a “never-ending project.” He does plan on taking things further and is currently working on a project that concerns Black men in the Diaspora. 
All photos courtesy of Damion Reid.
Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Instagram | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

oh lol I’m included!


I want to be all of them 💕heroineheroine:

2jam4u:

dynamicafrica:

Spotlight: Photographer Damion Reid and the “Beauty of the Black Woman” Project.
How do you describe what a black woman is? How do you even begin to define her?
You don’t. You leave that up to her.
As black women, as black people, we are well aware of our complexities - whether inherited or otherwise. What’s more, despite our differences being used to divide and separate us, whether through experience or heritage, history has played out in such a way that we are and will always be connected to each other in ways words cannot even begin to describe. As romantic as this may sound, and though there is so much beauty in who we are, there’s a lot of pain that we are still forced to triumph through. Despite all this, as we combat that which has manifested in our lives through both structural and internal racism, it’s so important that we look for ways to find and recreate ourselves on our terms.
Living in a world where black women have to constantly defend their existence and personally find ways to continuously reaffirm their beauty and self-worth, it’s hard not to love what Damion Reid does.
As a Communications Major, Reid was, to say the least, troubled by the negative images and stories he’d often come across of Black women and Black people in the Diaspora. In the Spring of 2002, armed with his camera and desire to show the multi-faceted reality of Black women, he began approaching women he’d see in public in an attempt to capture the “Beauty of the Black Woman.”
Ridding himself of mainstream notions of what beauty is or is supposed to look like, Reid opted to go for something deeper when approaching women, "I share a spiritual bond with Black Women. They are the only people that can understand what me a Black Male goes through. That is beauty to me. I go with my feelings. If it feels right to approach someone, I will do it."
So far, the responses Reid has received have been incredibly positive and wonderfully surprising, “Sometimes the Women are shocked that I want to photograph them. They were not used to be called beautiful, much less photographed.”
For Reid, this is a “never-ending project.” He does plan on taking things further and is currently working on a project that concerns Black men in the Diaspora. 
All photos courtesy of Damion Reid.
Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Instagram | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

oh lol I’m included!


I want to be all of them 💕heroineheroine:

2jam4u:

dynamicafrica:

Spotlight: Photographer Damion Reid and the “Beauty of the Black Woman” Project.
How do you describe what a black woman is? How do you even begin to define her?
You don’t. You leave that up to her.
As black women, as black people, we are well aware of our complexities - whether inherited or otherwise. What’s more, despite our differences being used to divide and separate us, whether through experience or heritage, history has played out in such a way that we are and will always be connected to each other in ways words cannot even begin to describe. As romantic as this may sound, and though there is so much beauty in who we are, there’s a lot of pain that we are still forced to triumph through. Despite all this, as we combat that which has manifested in our lives through both structural and internal racism, it’s so important that we look for ways to find and recreate ourselves on our terms.
Living in a world where black women have to constantly defend their existence and personally find ways to continuously reaffirm their beauty and self-worth, it’s hard not to love what Damion Reid does.
As a Communications Major, Reid was, to say the least, troubled by the negative images and stories he’d often come across of Black women and Black people in the Diaspora. In the Spring of 2002, armed with his camera and desire to show the multi-faceted reality of Black women, he began approaching women he’d see in public in an attempt to capture the “Beauty of the Black Woman.”
Ridding himself of mainstream notions of what beauty is or is supposed to look like, Reid opted to go for something deeper when approaching women, "I share a spiritual bond with Black Women. They are the only people that can understand what me a Black Male goes through. That is beauty to me. I go with my feelings. If it feels right to approach someone, I will do it."
So far, the responses Reid has received have been incredibly positive and wonderfully surprising, “Sometimes the Women are shocked that I want to photograph them. They were not used to be called beautiful, much less photographed.”
For Reid, this is a “never-ending project.” He does plan on taking things further and is currently working on a project that concerns Black men in the Diaspora. 
All photos courtesy of Damion Reid.
Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Instagram | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

oh lol I’m included!


I want to be all of them 💕heroineheroine:

2jam4u:

dynamicafrica:

Spotlight: Photographer Damion Reid and the “Beauty of the Black Woman” Project.
How do you describe what a black woman is? How do you even begin to define her?
You don’t. You leave that up to her.
As black women, as black people, we are well aware of our complexities - whether inherited or otherwise. What’s more, despite our differences being used to divide and separate us, whether through experience or heritage, history has played out in such a way that we are and will always be connected to each other in ways words cannot even begin to describe. As romantic as this may sound, and though there is so much beauty in who we are, there’s a lot of pain that we are still forced to triumph through. Despite all this, as we combat that which has manifested in our lives through both structural and internal racism, it’s so important that we look for ways to find and recreate ourselves on our terms.
Living in a world where black women have to constantly defend their existence and personally find ways to continuously reaffirm their beauty and self-worth, it’s hard not to love what Damion Reid does.
As a Communications Major, Reid was, to say the least, troubled by the negative images and stories he’d often come across of Black women and Black people in the Diaspora. In the Spring of 2002, armed with his camera and desire to show the multi-faceted reality of Black women, he began approaching women he’d see in public in an attempt to capture the “Beauty of the Black Woman.”
Ridding himself of mainstream notions of what beauty is or is supposed to look like, Reid opted to go for something deeper when approaching women, "I share a spiritual bond with Black Women. They are the only people that can understand what me a Black Male goes through. That is beauty to me. I go with my feelings. If it feels right to approach someone, I will do it."
So far, the responses Reid has received have been incredibly positive and wonderfully surprising, “Sometimes the Women are shocked that I want to photograph them. They were not used to be called beautiful, much less photographed.”
For Reid, this is a “never-ending project.” He does plan on taking things further and is currently working on a project that concerns Black men in the Diaspora. 
All photos courtesy of Damion Reid.
Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Instagram | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

oh lol I’m included!


I want to be all of them 💕heroineheroine:

2jam4u:

dynamicafrica:

Spotlight: Photographer Damion Reid and the “Beauty of the Black Woman” Project.
How do you describe what a black woman is? How do you even begin to define her?
You don’t. You leave that up to her.
As black women, as black people, we are well aware of our complexities - whether inherited or otherwise. What’s more, despite our differences being used to divide and separate us, whether through experience or heritage, history has played out in such a way that we are and will always be connected to each other in ways words cannot even begin to describe. As romantic as this may sound, and though there is so much beauty in who we are, there’s a lot of pain that we are still forced to triumph through. Despite all this, as we combat that which has manifested in our lives through both structural and internal racism, it’s so important that we look for ways to find and recreate ourselves on our terms.
Living in a world where black women have to constantly defend their existence and personally find ways to continuously reaffirm their beauty and self-worth, it’s hard not to love what Damion Reid does.
As a Communications Major, Reid was, to say the least, troubled by the negative images and stories he’d often come across of Black women and Black people in the Diaspora. In the Spring of 2002, armed with his camera and desire to show the multi-faceted reality of Black women, he began approaching women he’d see in public in an attempt to capture the “Beauty of the Black Woman.”
Ridding himself of mainstream notions of what beauty is or is supposed to look like, Reid opted to go for something deeper when approaching women, "I share a spiritual bond with Black Women. They are the only people that can understand what me a Black Male goes through. That is beauty to me. I go with my feelings. If it feels right to approach someone, I will do it."
So far, the responses Reid has received have been incredibly positive and wonderfully surprising, “Sometimes the Women are shocked that I want to photograph them. They were not used to be called beautiful, much less photographed.”
For Reid, this is a “never-ending project.” He does plan on taking things further and is currently working on a project that concerns Black men in the Diaspora. 
All photos courtesy of Damion Reid.
Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Instagram | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

oh lol I’m included!


I want to be all of them 💕heroineheroine:

2jam4u:

dynamicafrica:

Spotlight: Photographer Damion Reid and the “Beauty of the Black Woman” Project.
How do you describe what a black woman is? How do you even begin to define her?
You don’t. You leave that up to her.
As black women, as black people, we are well aware of our complexities - whether inherited or otherwise. What’s more, despite our differences being used to divide and separate us, whether through experience or heritage, history has played out in such a way that we are and will always be connected to each other in ways words cannot even begin to describe. As romantic as this may sound, and though there is so much beauty in who we are, there’s a lot of pain that we are still forced to triumph through. Despite all this, as we combat that which has manifested in our lives through both structural and internal racism, it’s so important that we look for ways to find and recreate ourselves on our terms.
Living in a world where black women have to constantly defend their existence and personally find ways to continuously reaffirm their beauty and self-worth, it’s hard not to love what Damion Reid does.
As a Communications Major, Reid was, to say the least, troubled by the negative images and stories he’d often come across of Black women and Black people in the Diaspora. In the Spring of 2002, armed with his camera and desire to show the multi-faceted reality of Black women, he began approaching women he’d see in public in an attempt to capture the “Beauty of the Black Woman.”
Ridding himself of mainstream notions of what beauty is or is supposed to look like, Reid opted to go for something deeper when approaching women, "I share a spiritual bond with Black Women. They are the only people that can understand what me a Black Male goes through. That is beauty to me. I go with my feelings. If it feels right to approach someone, I will do it."
So far, the responses Reid has received have been incredibly positive and wonderfully surprising, “Sometimes the Women are shocked that I want to photograph them. They were not used to be called beautiful, much less photographed.”
For Reid, this is a “never-ending project.” He does plan on taking things further and is currently working on a project that concerns Black men in the Diaspora. 
All photos courtesy of Damion Reid.
Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Instagram | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

oh lol I’m included!


I want to be all of them 💕heroineheroine:

2jam4u:

dynamicafrica:

Spotlight: Photographer Damion Reid and the “Beauty of the Black Woman” Project.
How do you describe what a black woman is? How do you even begin to define her?
You don’t. You leave that up to her.
As black women, as black people, we are well aware of our complexities - whether inherited or otherwise. What’s more, despite our differences being used to divide and separate us, whether through experience or heritage, history has played out in such a way that we are and will always be connected to each other in ways words cannot even begin to describe. As romantic as this may sound, and though there is so much beauty in who we are, there’s a lot of pain that we are still forced to triumph through. Despite all this, as we combat that which has manifested in our lives through both structural and internal racism, it’s so important that we look for ways to find and recreate ourselves on our terms.
Living in a world where black women have to constantly defend their existence and personally find ways to continuously reaffirm their beauty and self-worth, it’s hard not to love what Damion Reid does.
As a Communications Major, Reid was, to say the least, troubled by the negative images and stories he’d often come across of Black women and Black people in the Diaspora. In the Spring of 2002, armed with his camera and desire to show the multi-faceted reality of Black women, he began approaching women he’d see in public in an attempt to capture the “Beauty of the Black Woman.”
Ridding himself of mainstream notions of what beauty is or is supposed to look like, Reid opted to go for something deeper when approaching women, "I share a spiritual bond with Black Women. They are the only people that can understand what me a Black Male goes through. That is beauty to me. I go with my feelings. If it feels right to approach someone, I will do it."
So far, the responses Reid has received have been incredibly positive and wonderfully surprising, “Sometimes the Women are shocked that I want to photograph them. They were not used to be called beautiful, much less photographed.”
For Reid, this is a “never-ending project.” He does plan on taking things further and is currently working on a project that concerns Black men in the Diaspora. 
All photos courtesy of Damion Reid.
Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Instagram | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

oh lol I’m included!


I want to be all of them 💕heroineheroine:

2jam4u:

dynamicafrica:

Spotlight: Photographer Damion Reid and the “Beauty of the Black Woman” Project.
How do you describe what a black woman is? How do you even begin to define her?
You don’t. You leave that up to her.
As black women, as black people, we are well aware of our complexities - whether inherited or otherwise. What’s more, despite our differences being used to divide and separate us, whether through experience or heritage, history has played out in such a way that we are and will always be connected to each other in ways words cannot even begin to describe. As romantic as this may sound, and though there is so much beauty in who we are, there’s a lot of pain that we are still forced to triumph through. Despite all this, as we combat that which has manifested in our lives through both structural and internal racism, it’s so important that we look for ways to find and recreate ourselves on our terms.
Living in a world where black women have to constantly defend their existence and personally find ways to continuously reaffirm their beauty and self-worth, it’s hard not to love what Damion Reid does.
As a Communications Major, Reid was, to say the least, troubled by the negative images and stories he’d often come across of Black women and Black people in the Diaspora. In the Spring of 2002, armed with his camera and desire to show the multi-faceted reality of Black women, he began approaching women he’d see in public in an attempt to capture the “Beauty of the Black Woman.”
Ridding himself of mainstream notions of what beauty is or is supposed to look like, Reid opted to go for something deeper when approaching women, "I share a spiritual bond with Black Women. They are the only people that can understand what me a Black Male goes through. That is beauty to me. I go with my feelings. If it feels right to approach someone, I will do it."
So far, the responses Reid has received have been incredibly positive and wonderfully surprising, “Sometimes the Women are shocked that I want to photograph them. They were not used to be called beautiful, much less photographed.”
For Reid, this is a “never-ending project.” He does plan on taking things further and is currently working on a project that concerns Black men in the Diaspora. 
All photos courtesy of Damion Reid.
Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Instagram | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

oh lol I’m included!


I want to be all of them 💕heroineheroine:

2jam4u:

dynamicafrica:

Spotlight: Photographer Damion Reid and the “Beauty of the Black Woman” Project.
How do you describe what a black woman is? How do you even begin to define her?
You don’t. You leave that up to her.
As black women, as black people, we are well aware of our complexities - whether inherited or otherwise. What’s more, despite our differences being used to divide and separate us, whether through experience or heritage, history has played out in such a way that we are and will always be connected to each other in ways words cannot even begin to describe. As romantic as this may sound, and though there is so much beauty in who we are, there’s a lot of pain that we are still forced to triumph through. Despite all this, as we combat that which has manifested in our lives through both structural and internal racism, it’s so important that we look for ways to find and recreate ourselves on our terms.
Living in a world where black women have to constantly defend their existence and personally find ways to continuously reaffirm their beauty and self-worth, it’s hard not to love what Damion Reid does.
As a Communications Major, Reid was, to say the least, troubled by the negative images and stories he’d often come across of Black women and Black people in the Diaspora. In the Spring of 2002, armed with his camera and desire to show the multi-faceted reality of Black women, he began approaching women he’d see in public in an attempt to capture the “Beauty of the Black Woman.”
Ridding himself of mainstream notions of what beauty is or is supposed to look like, Reid opted to go for something deeper when approaching women, "I share a spiritual bond with Black Women. They are the only people that can understand what me a Black Male goes through. That is beauty to me. I go with my feelings. If it feels right to approach someone, I will do it."
So far, the responses Reid has received have been incredibly positive and wonderfully surprising, “Sometimes the Women are shocked that I want to photograph them. They were not used to be called beautiful, much less photographed.”
For Reid, this is a “never-ending project.” He does plan on taking things further and is currently working on a project that concerns Black men in the Diaspora. 
All photos courtesy of Damion Reid.
Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Instagram | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

oh lol I’m included!


I want to be all of them 💕

heroineheroine:

2jam4u:

dynamicafrica:

Spotlight: Photographer Damion Reid and the “Beauty of the Black Woman” Project.

How do you describe what a black woman is? How do you even begin to define her?

You don’t. You leave that up to her.

As black women, as black people, we are well aware of our complexities - whether inherited or otherwise. What’s more, despite our differences being used to divide and separate us, whether through experience or heritage, history has played out in such a way that we are and will always be connected to each other in ways words cannot even begin to describe. As romantic as this may sound, and though there is so much beauty in who we are, there’s a lot of pain that we are still forced to triumph through. Despite all this, as we combat that which has manifested in our lives through both structural and internal racism, it’s so important that we look for ways to find and recreate ourselves on our terms.

Living in a world where black women have to constantly defend their existence and personally find ways to continuously reaffirm their beauty and self-worth, it’s hard not to love what Damion Reid does.

As a Communications Major, Reid was, to say the least, troubled by the negative images and stories he’d often come across of Black women and Black people in the Diaspora. In the Spring of 2002, armed with his camera and desire to show the multi-faceted reality of Black women, he began approaching women he’d see in public in an attempt to capture the “Beauty of the Black Woman.”

Ridding himself of mainstream notions of what beauty is or is supposed to look like, Reid opted to go for something deeper when approaching women, "I share a spiritual bond with Black Women. They are the only people that can understand what me a Black Male goes through. That is beauty to me. I go with my feelings. If it feels right to approach someone, I will do it."

So far, the responses Reid has received have been incredibly positive and wonderfully surprising, “Sometimes the Women are shocked that I want to photograph them. They were not used to be called beautiful, much less photographed.”

For Reid, this is a “never-ending project.” He does plan on taking things further and is currently working on a project that concerns Black men in the Diaspora. 

All photos courtesy of Damion Reid.

Twitter | FacebookPinterest | InstagramSoundcloud | Mixcloud

oh lol I’m included!

I want to be all of them 💕


5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 
Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.
Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.
“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”
[h/t: generic-art]
5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 
Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.
Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.
“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”
[h/t: generic-art]
5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 
Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.
Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.
“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”
[h/t: generic-art]
5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 
Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.
Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.
“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”
[h/t: generic-art]
5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 
Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.
Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.
“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”
[h/t: generic-art]
5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 
Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.
Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.
“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”
[h/t: generic-art]
5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 
Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.
Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.
“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”
[h/t: generic-art]
5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 
Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.
Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.
“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”
[h/t: generic-art]
5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 
Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.
Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.
“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”
[h/t: generic-art]
5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 
Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.
Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.
“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”
[h/t: generic-art]
5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 

Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.

Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.

“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

[h/t: generic-art]

(Source: angelclark)


asylum-art:

Chemical Balance: Creative installation by Jean Shin created with recycled pill bottles to make chandelier. 2005

Chemical Balance III, 2009  Prescription bottles, mirror and epoxy, fluorescent lights 5 units, from 18 to 40 inches in diameter Overall dimensions variable Installation at Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.

Prescription bottles, mirror and epoxy
7 units, from 18 to 38 inches in diameter
Commissioned by University Art Museum, Albany, NY
To create this work, thousands of empty prescription pill bottles were collected from nursing homes, pharmacies and individuals’ medicine cabinets. Like stalactites and stalagmites, the constructions hang down from above and grow upwards from the floor below. Chemical Balance speaks to our culture’s over-consumption of prescription drugs and our bodies’ dependency on these medications. The piece acts like a group portrait, mapping our society’s chemical intake. The illuminated structures radiate with an intense orange glow, suggesting that issues of health reach far beyond the physical.


“Chemical Balance 2” relates to three of “Molecules that Matter” 10 molecules: polyethylene (the plastic in the prescription pill bottles), and more subtly, penicillin and Prozac, two drugs that may once been inside those bottles.asylum-art:

Chemical Balance: Creative installation by Jean Shin created with recycled pill bottles to make chandelier. 2005

Chemical Balance III, 2009  Prescription bottles, mirror and epoxy, fluorescent lights 5 units, from 18 to 40 inches in diameter Overall dimensions variable Installation at Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.

Prescription bottles, mirror and epoxy
7 units, from 18 to 38 inches in diameter
Commissioned by University Art Museum, Albany, NY
To create this work, thousands of empty prescription pill bottles were collected from nursing homes, pharmacies and individuals’ medicine cabinets. Like stalactites and stalagmites, the constructions hang down from above and grow upwards from the floor below. Chemical Balance speaks to our culture’s over-consumption of prescription drugs and our bodies’ dependency on these medications. The piece acts like a group portrait, mapping our society’s chemical intake. The illuminated structures radiate with an intense orange glow, suggesting that issues of health reach far beyond the physical.


“Chemical Balance 2” relates to three of “Molecules that Matter” 10 molecules: polyethylene (the plastic in the prescription pill bottles), and more subtly, penicillin and Prozac, two drugs that may once been inside those bottles.asylum-art:

Chemical Balance: Creative installation by Jean Shin created with recycled pill bottles to make chandelier. 2005

Chemical Balance III, 2009  Prescription bottles, mirror and epoxy, fluorescent lights 5 units, from 18 to 40 inches in diameter Overall dimensions variable Installation at Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.

Prescription bottles, mirror and epoxy
7 units, from 18 to 38 inches in diameter
Commissioned by University Art Museum, Albany, NY
To create this work, thousands of empty prescription pill bottles were collected from nursing homes, pharmacies and individuals’ medicine cabinets. Like stalactites and stalagmites, the constructions hang down from above and grow upwards from the floor below. Chemical Balance speaks to our culture’s over-consumption of prescription drugs and our bodies’ dependency on these medications. The piece acts like a group portrait, mapping our society’s chemical intake. The illuminated structures radiate with an intense orange glow, suggesting that issues of health reach far beyond the physical.


“Chemical Balance 2” relates to three of “Molecules that Matter” 10 molecules: polyethylene (the plastic in the prescription pill bottles), and more subtly, penicillin and Prozac, two drugs that may once been inside those bottles.asylum-art:

Chemical Balance: Creative installation by Jean Shin created with recycled pill bottles to make chandelier. 2005

Chemical Balance III, 2009  Prescription bottles, mirror and epoxy, fluorescent lights 5 units, from 18 to 40 inches in diameter Overall dimensions variable Installation at Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.

Prescription bottles, mirror and epoxy
7 units, from 18 to 38 inches in diameter
Commissioned by University Art Museum, Albany, NY
To create this work, thousands of empty prescription pill bottles were collected from nursing homes, pharmacies and individuals’ medicine cabinets. Like stalactites and stalagmites, the constructions hang down from above and grow upwards from the floor below. Chemical Balance speaks to our culture’s over-consumption of prescription drugs and our bodies’ dependency on these medications. The piece acts like a group portrait, mapping our society’s chemical intake. The illuminated structures radiate with an intense orange glow, suggesting that issues of health reach far beyond the physical.


“Chemical Balance 2” relates to three of “Molecules that Matter” 10 molecules: polyethylene (the plastic in the prescription pill bottles), and more subtly, penicillin and Prozac, two drugs that may once been inside those bottles.asylum-art:

Chemical Balance: Creative installation by Jean Shin created with recycled pill bottles to make chandelier. 2005

Chemical Balance III, 2009  Prescription bottles, mirror and epoxy, fluorescent lights 5 units, from 18 to 40 inches in diameter Overall dimensions variable Installation at Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.

Prescription bottles, mirror and epoxy
7 units, from 18 to 38 inches in diameter
Commissioned by University Art Museum, Albany, NY
To create this work, thousands of empty prescription pill bottles were collected from nursing homes, pharmacies and individuals’ medicine cabinets. Like stalactites and stalagmites, the constructions hang down from above and grow upwards from the floor below. Chemical Balance speaks to our culture’s over-consumption of prescription drugs and our bodies’ dependency on these medications. The piece acts like a group portrait, mapping our society’s chemical intake. The illuminated structures radiate with an intense orange glow, suggesting that issues of health reach far beyond the physical.


“Chemical Balance 2” relates to three of “Molecules that Matter” 10 molecules: polyethylene (the plastic in the prescription pill bottles), and more subtly, penicillin and Prozac, two drugs that may once been inside those bottles.asylum-art:

Chemical Balance: Creative installation by Jean Shin created with recycled pill bottles to make chandelier. 2005

Chemical Balance III, 2009  Prescription bottles, mirror and epoxy, fluorescent lights 5 units, from 18 to 40 inches in diameter Overall dimensions variable Installation at Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.

Prescription bottles, mirror and epoxy
7 units, from 18 to 38 inches in diameter
Commissioned by University Art Museum, Albany, NY
To create this work, thousands of empty prescription pill bottles were collected from nursing homes, pharmacies and individuals’ medicine cabinets. Like stalactites and stalagmites, the constructions hang down from above and grow upwards from the floor below. Chemical Balance speaks to our culture’s over-consumption of prescription drugs and our bodies’ dependency on these medications. The piece acts like a group portrait, mapping our society’s chemical intake. The illuminated structures radiate with an intense orange glow, suggesting that issues of health reach far beyond the physical.


“Chemical Balance 2” relates to three of “Molecules that Matter” 10 molecules: polyethylene (the plastic in the prescription pill bottles), and more subtly, penicillin and Prozac, two drugs that may once been inside those bottles.asylum-art:

Chemical Balance: Creative installation by Jean Shin created with recycled pill bottles to make chandelier. 2005

Chemical Balance III, 2009  Prescription bottles, mirror and epoxy, fluorescent lights 5 units, from 18 to 40 inches in diameter Overall dimensions variable Installation at Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.

Prescription bottles, mirror and epoxy
7 units, from 18 to 38 inches in diameter
Commissioned by University Art Museum, Albany, NY
To create this work, thousands of empty prescription pill bottles were collected from nursing homes, pharmacies and individuals’ medicine cabinets. Like stalactites and stalagmites, the constructions hang down from above and grow upwards from the floor below. Chemical Balance speaks to our culture’s over-consumption of prescription drugs and our bodies’ dependency on these medications. The piece acts like a group portrait, mapping our society’s chemical intake. The illuminated structures radiate with an intense orange glow, suggesting that issues of health reach far beyond the physical.


“Chemical Balance 2” relates to three of “Molecules that Matter” 10 molecules: polyethylene (the plastic in the prescription pill bottles), and more subtly, penicillin and Prozac, two drugs that may once been inside those bottles.asylum-art:

Chemical Balance: Creative installation by Jean Shin created with recycled pill bottles to make chandelier. 2005

Chemical Balance III, 2009  Prescription bottles, mirror and epoxy, fluorescent lights 5 units, from 18 to 40 inches in diameter Overall dimensions variable Installation at Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.

Prescription bottles, mirror and epoxy
7 units, from 18 to 38 inches in diameter
Commissioned by University Art Museum, Albany, NY
To create this work, thousands of empty prescription pill bottles were collected from nursing homes, pharmacies and individuals’ medicine cabinets. Like stalactites and stalagmites, the constructions hang down from above and grow upwards from the floor below. Chemical Balance speaks to our culture’s over-consumption of prescription drugs and our bodies’ dependency on these medications. The piece acts like a group portrait, mapping our society’s chemical intake. The illuminated structures radiate with an intense orange glow, suggesting that issues of health reach far beyond the physical.


“Chemical Balance 2” relates to three of “Molecules that Matter” 10 molecules: polyethylene (the plastic in the prescription pill bottles), and more subtly, penicillin and Prozac, two drugs that may once been inside those bottles.

asylum-art:

Chemical Balance: Creative installation by Jean Shin created with recycled pill bottles to make chandelier. 2005

Chemical Balance III, 2009 
Prescription bottles, mirror and epoxy, fluorescent lights
5 units, from 18 to 40 inches in diameter
Overall dimensions variable
Installation at Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.

Prescription bottles, mirror and epoxy

7 units, from 18 to 38 inches in diameter

Commissioned by University Art Museum, Albany, NY

To create this work, thousands of empty prescription pill bottles were collected from nursing homes, pharmacies and individuals’ medicine cabinets. Like stalactites and stalagmites, the constructions hang down from above and grow upwards from the floor below. Chemical Balance speaks to our culture’s over-consumption of prescription drugs and our bodies’ dependency on these medications. The piece acts like a group portrait, mapping our society’s chemical intake. The illuminated structures radiate with an intense orange glow, suggesting that issues of health reach far beyond the physical.

“Chemical Balance 2” relates to three of “Molecules that Matter” 10 molecules: polyethylene (the plastic in the prescription pill bottles), and more subtly, penicillin and Prozac, two drugs that may once been inside those bottles.


asylum-art:

Hyper Realistic Pencil Drawings byJono Dry
on deviantART
South African artist Jono Dry creates awesome large-scale pencil drawings, many of which are a beautiful blend of photorealistic style and surrealistic subject matter. A completely self-taught and very meticulous artist, Jono sometimes spends months on a single piece in order to achieve such an astonishing level of detail.




asylum-art:

Hyper Realistic Pencil Drawings byJono Dry
on deviantART
South African artist Jono Dry creates awesome large-scale pencil drawings, many of which are a beautiful blend of photorealistic style and surrealistic subject matter. A completely self-taught and very meticulous artist, Jono sometimes spends months on a single piece in order to achieve such an astonishing level of detail.




asylum-art:

Hyper Realistic Pencil Drawings byJono Dry
on deviantART
South African artist Jono Dry creates awesome large-scale pencil drawings, many of which are a beautiful blend of photorealistic style and surrealistic subject matter. A completely self-taught and very meticulous artist, Jono sometimes spends months on a single piece in order to achieve such an astonishing level of detail.




asylum-art:

Hyper Realistic Pencil Drawings byJono Dry
on deviantART
South African artist Jono Dry creates awesome large-scale pencil drawings, many of which are a beautiful blend of photorealistic style and surrealistic subject matter. A completely self-taught and very meticulous artist, Jono sometimes spends months on a single piece in order to achieve such an astonishing level of detail.




asylum-art:

Hyper Realistic Pencil Drawings byJono Dry
on deviantART
South African artist Jono Dry creates awesome large-scale pencil drawings, many of which are a beautiful blend of photorealistic style and surrealistic subject matter. A completely self-taught and very meticulous artist, Jono sometimes spends months on a single piece in order to achieve such an astonishing level of detail.




asylum-art:

Hyper Realistic Pencil Drawings byJono Dry
on deviantART
South African artist Jono Dry creates awesome large-scale pencil drawings, many of which are a beautiful blend of photorealistic style and surrealistic subject matter. A completely self-taught and very meticulous artist, Jono sometimes spends months on a single piece in order to achieve such an astonishing level of detail.




asylum-art:

Hyper Realistic Pencil Drawings byJono Dry
on deviantART
South African artist Jono Dry creates awesome large-scale pencil drawings, many of which are a beautiful blend of photorealistic style and surrealistic subject matter. A completely self-taught and very meticulous artist, Jono sometimes spends months on a single piece in order to achieve such an astonishing level of detail.




asylum-art:

Hyper Realistic Pencil Drawings byJono Dry
on deviantART
South African artist Jono Dry creates awesome large-scale pencil drawings, many of which are a beautiful blend of photorealistic style and surrealistic subject matter. A completely self-taught and very meticulous artist, Jono sometimes spends months on a single piece in order to achieve such an astonishing level of detail.




asylum-art:

Hyper Realistic Pencil Drawings byJono Dry
on deviantART
South African artist Jono Dry creates awesome large-scale pencil drawings, many of which are a beautiful blend of photorealistic style and surrealistic subject matter. A completely self-taught and very meticulous artist, Jono sometimes spends months on a single piece in order to achieve such an astonishing level of detail.




asylum-art:

Hyper Realistic Pencil Drawings byJono Dry
on deviantART
South African artist Jono Dry creates awesome large-scale pencil drawings, many of which are a beautiful blend of photorealistic style and surrealistic subject matter. A completely self-taught and very meticulous artist, Jono sometimes spends months on a single piece in order to achieve such an astonishing level of detail.

asylum-art:

Hyper Realistic Pencil Drawings byJono Dry

on deviantART

South African artist Jono Dry creates awesome large-scale pencil drawings, many of which are a beautiful blend of photorealistic style and surrealistic subject matter. A completely self-taught and very meticulous artist, Jono sometimes spends months on a single piece in order to achieve such an astonishing level of detail.